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History in the Kruger to Canyons Region is diverse and very colourful from early evidence of Stone Age people from around 1.5 million to 9 000 years ago, through to more modern historical sequences such as the political development of South Africa.

REGIONAL HISTORY

History in the Kruger to Canyons Region is diverse and very colourful from early evidence of Stone Age people from around 1.5 million to 9 000 years ago, through to  more modern historical sequences such as the political development of South Africa

ARCHEOLOGY


Archaeology is rife in the K2C region.  The Lowveld Region on whole is dotted with hills and valleys where you will find traces of the early San (Bushmen) people to iron age ruins

BIOSPHERE HISTORY

The decision to form a biosphere within the Lowveld Region was taken and initiated by the greater community of the central lowveld and from there was presented to Government for support and shared development

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Records indicate that the San were the first inhabitants of this area, however, they seemed to have been killed off by the early Black immigrants that moved down here from the North.   This seems to line up with the early Iron Age People (AD 200 - AD 1400).   Populations of these early immigrants were very small and were mainly metal workers, farmers, potters and herders.    

Large portions of the lower lying regions in the K2C region were uninhabitable on a permanent basis due to the presence of both Malaria and more so, the dreaded disease known as “sleeping sickness” transferred by the tsetse fly and affected both man and his cattle. .

The first Europeans arrived into the area around 1838, with a second group arriving in 1844.  Neither were able to settle permanently as a result of the losses sustained from sleeping sickness and the tstetse fly.    Many of the initial European settlers, as with their native counterparts, settled in the higher lying regions and moved down into the lowveld to hunt game for trade and for the pot.

As more and more settlers moved to the region, there were greater pressures inflicted on the wildlife population.   It was only in 1891 that any kind of hunting legislation was introduced and finally in 1898, the Sabie Game Reserve - the precursor to the world renown Kruger National Park, was established. (Carruthers 1995).   The Anglo Boer war broke out in 1899 during which time there was little control or protection offered in the original reserve and it was only in 1902, once the victorious British “proclaimed” the reserve once again, that conservation of our wilderness started in earnest.

Policy, focus and strategy of conservation has changed greatly over the years, yet Kruger National Park still remains one of the leaders in the industry and has been able to establish a great deal of data and historical records on conservation attempts implemented that are able to guide and assist more advanced and informed decisions made today

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